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Did The Tribe Win Last Night? | July 12, 2020

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Ruben Amaro

Big League Sons Who Followed Dads’ Footsteps with the Tribe

June 21, 2020 |

Children of Major Leaguers often get a unique experience and view of the game of baseball from an early age while also being blessed with some choice genes and skill sets that make them all the more prepared to pursue the national pastime as their career of choice.

While plenty of kids of former big leaguers have failed to reach The Show despite giving it their best down on the farm, others have put together lengthy and successful careers as second generation players.

Six father-son tandems (Jim Bagby and Jim Bagby; Earl Averill and Earl Averill Jr.; Tito Francona and Terry Francona; Buddy Bell and David Bell; Dave Duncan and Shelley Duncan; and Cam Carreon and Mark Carreon) have had the privilege of representing the Cleveland Indians organization on the field during their respective careers. Read More

The Greatest Summer Ever: Ruben Amaro

April 21, 2015 |

Throughout the 2015 season, Did the Tribe Win Last Night will take a look back at the 1995 Cleveland Indians for the 20th anniversary of their fourth pennant winning season. Included will be historic game recaps, headlining stories and a ranking of the team’s most influential players that truly made 1995 The Greatest Summer Ever. Today looks back at player #27: Ruben Amaro.

Ruben Amaro is and will always be remembered as a Philadelphia Phillie, spending five of his eight Major League seasons as a player in the City of Brotherly Love and then more than a decade and a half as a member of their front office and eventually their General Manager. In Cleveland, however, Amaro should be remembered for being a member of the exciting 1994 and dominant 1995 Indians teams and a man who cemented his face on Tribe highlight tapes forever.

During Game Six of the ’95 ALCS against the Seattle Mariners, Amaro was the man who scored first on a wild pitch from Randy Johnson that Kenny Lofton alertly scored on as well. With Lofton at second and Amaro at third, Johnson fired a pitch that skipped off Dan Wilson‘s glove and rolled to the backstop. Amaro scored easily, but the lightning-fast Lofton blazed the Kingdome turf and put the pennant-winning game squarely in the Indians hands. Read More