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Did The Tribe Win Last Night? | July 27, 2021

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Mike Hargrove

Today in Tribe History: June 14, 1979

June 14, 2015 |

1979 – The Cleveland Indians acquire first baseman Mike Hargrove from the San Diego Padres in exchange for third baseman/outfielder Paul Dade.

In acquiring Hargrove, the Indians received the former 1974 American League Rookie of the Year and 1975 AL … Read More

1995 Game Recap: 9-1 Homestand Ends with Thome Walk-Off—Indians 3, Tigers 2

June 7, 2015 |

Throughout the 2015 season, Did the Tribe Win Last Night will take a look back at the 1995 Cleveland Indians for the 20th anniversary of their fourth pennant winning season. Included will be historic game recaps, headlining stories and a ranking of the team’s most influential players that truly made 1995 The Greatest Summer Ever. Today looks back June 7, 1995.

Tribe fans had to wait over 11 months between walk-off homeruns until Paul Sorrento hit his on Sunday, but they only had to wait three days to see the next one. In what turned out to be an outstanding pitcher’s duel until the very end, the Indians got the best of the Detroit Tigers in 10 innings on Wednesday night when Jim Thome took Brian Maxcy deep for a 3-2, walk-off victory.

Thome’s titanic blast marked the Indians 10th victory in their last at bat this season. Seven of those aforementioned wins have come at Jacobs Field—five on this homestand alone. Since Cleveland’s new ballpark opened 14 months ago, the Tribe has blasted seven walk-off homers and have won 19 times in their last at bat. Read More

1995 Game Recap: Sorrento’s Clout Caps Comeback—Indians 9, Blue Jays 8

June 4, 2015 |

Throughout the 2015 season, Did the Tribe Win Last Night will take a look back at the 1995 Cleveland Indians for the 20th anniversary of their fourth pennant winning season. Included will be historic game recaps, headlining stories and a ranking of the team’s most influential players that truly made 1995 The Greatest Summer Ever. Today looks back June 4, 1995.

The Jacobs Field Magic of 1994 has officially returned for 1995.

The Indians (24-10) took on one of baseball’s best pitchers, fell behind 8-0 in the second inning and still managed to walk away with the biggest comeback win of the season on a walk-off homerun by Paul Sorrento. The Tribe used an outstanding relief appearance by rookie Chad Ogea and their mighty offense battled all the way back to defeat the still two-time reigning World Series champion Toronto Blue Jays by a score of 9-8 on Sunday afternoon. Read More

Today in Tribe History: June 4, 1974

June 4, 2015 |

1974 – In a promotional event gone awry, the Cleveland Indians are forced to forfeit their game against the Texas Rangers as the “10-cent beer night” promotion leads to fan unruliness and a violent playing environment at Cleveland Municipal Stadium.

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The Greatest Summer Ever: The Steady Influence

June 2, 2015 |

Throughout the 2015 season, Did the Tribe Win Last Night will take a look back at the 1995 Cleveland Indians for the 20th anniversary of their fourth pennant winning season. Included will be historic game recaps, headlining stories and a ranking of the team’s most influential players that truly made 1995 The Greatest Summer Ever. Today looks back at the importance of Hall of Famer Eddie Murray.

“When I got to the big leagues, there was a man – Eddie Murray – who showed me how to play this game, day in and day out. I thank him for his example.”

–Hall of Famer Cal Ripken, Jr.

Ever since the beginning of his career, Eddie Murray was having an influence on the teammates surrounding him. Murray was always the consummate professional, the pro’s pro, the father figure…the steady one. Read More

The Greatest Summer Ever: Building a Pennant Winner

May 2, 2015 |

Throughout the 2015 season, Did the Tribe Win Last Night will take a look back at the 1995 Cleveland Indians for the 20th anniversary of their fourth pennant winning season. Included will be historic game recaps, headlining stories and a ranking of the team’s most influential players that truly made 1995 The Greatest Summer Ever. Today looks back at how the 1995 Indians roster was constructed.

After spending four decades out of first place, it was easy in 1995 to wonder how in the world the Cleveland Indians found themselves at the top of the baseball world. Wondering what they finally did right and why it took so long to do it was a legitimate question and fans that did not follow the team closely had to wonder:

Where in the world did these guys come from? Read More

Today in Tribe History: November 1, 1999

November 1, 2014 |

Cleveland Indians hitting coach Charlie Manuel is announced as the club’s new manager, replacing Mike Hargrove, who was let go after leading the club for parts of nine seasons.

Hargrove posted a 721-591 record during his Indians tenure, leading the … Read More

Eighteen Crazy Nights—Looking back at the 1997 Cleveland Indians

October 26, 2014 | | 3 Comments

During the month of October DTTWLN will take a look back at the 1997 Cleveland Indians season—specifically the 18 thrilling games of the postseason as the Indians made an improbable run to game seven of the World Series.

PART TWENTY-TWO:  WORLD SERIES GAME 7—THE BITTER END

Game Seven.

Cleveland had certainly been down a long and winding path that took them to baseball’s biggest stage.

The Indians had extremely lowered expectations heading into Spring Training, they traded their best and most popular player before camp broke and they underwhelmed all season with a pitching staff that looked more unwatchable than some Triple-A staffs.

They were huge underdogs when they faced the Yankees and Orioles on their unimaginable trip through the playoffs, yet they sent both foes packing.  They had battled through sloppy play and historically-cold weather in Cleveland to take the Marlins to the brink of elimination in a winner-take-all showdown in Miami.

For Marlins fans, the feeling was optimistic and fun-loving.  Their team was only in its fifth season of existence, and they were just waiting for good things to happen.  For Cleveland fans, things could not have been tenser.  For years, Cleveland had suffered through unbelievable and unbearable heartbreak. Read More

Eighteen Crazy Nights—Looking back at the 1997 Cleveland Indians

October 22, 2014 | | One Comment

During the month of October DTTWLN will take a look back at the 1997 Cleveland Indians season—specifically the 18 thrilling games of the postseason as the Indians made an improbable run to game seven of the World Series.

PART NINETEEN:  WORLD SERIES GAME 4—THE ROOKIE HAS THE WRIGHT STUFF

On October 22, 1997, a frigid air mass pushed south from Canada.  It swept across Lake Erie as lake-effect snow covered Cleveland and the temperature plummeted to 38°.  Huge gusts howled through the downtown area and the wind-chill dropped to a numbing 15°.

It was abnormally cold in Northeast Ohio, as the average temperature for October 22 in Cleveland was a mild 58°.  As Game Four of the 1997 Fall Classic was about to begin, however, the stage was set for an infamous showdown between the Florida Marlins and the Cleveland Indians in what became the coldest World Series game in recorded history.

As the players took batting practice, heavy snow showers fell in the ballpark and turned Jacobs Field into a winter wonderland.  Christmas carols echoed throughout the stadium, as the Indians creative staff blared them over the public address system. Read More

Eighteen Crazy Nights—Looking back at the 1997 Cleveland Indians

October 21, 2014 |

During the month of October DTTWLN will take a look back at the 1997 Cleveland Indians season—specifically the 18 thrilling games of the postseason as the Indians made an improbable run to game seven of the World Series.

PART EIGHTEEN:  WORLD SERIES GAME 3—FOOTBALL WEATHER AND FOOTBALL NUMBERS

The city of Cleveland has long been a football town, but when Browns owner Art Modell moved his beloved franchise to Baltimore in 1995, the town turned to baseball as its #1 love.

The Indians were the talk of the town—the golden children now that the Browns were long gone.  In 1997, they were competing in their second World Series in three years and had come back from sunny Miami tied at 1-1 with the Florida Marlins.

Normally, an October 21st game that was played while the wind-chill was 23° would be reserved for the Cleveland Browns, but that was exactly what the Indians and Mother Nature brought to Jacobs Field for Game Three of the ’97 Fall Classic. Read More

Nine Straight at Home is Halfway to 20-Year Old Record

June 11, 2014 |

The Indians have not lost a game at home since May 18, when Justin Masterson was shelled by the Oakland Athletics to complete a three-game sweep at the hands of baseball’s best team.  Since then, the Tribe has swept the division-leading Tigers, the hard-hitting Rockies and the defending World Champion Red Sox to an impressive nine game home win streak. 

Polar opposite on the road, the team’s home record has launched them up the standings from a seat in last place.  The ballclub is only half way, however, to making club history.  The Indians franchise record for consecutive home wins was occurring 20 years ago today, as the 1994 Indians rolled from May 13 until June 25 during their first season in their new ballpark which was then known as Jacobs Field. Read More

The Top 20 Moments in Jacobs Field History: Snowpening Day

May 10, 2014 |

The 2014 season will mark 20 years of baseball at Progressive (ie Jacobs) Field. It’s been a relatively short history (although with the stadium building boom in the late 1990s and early 2000s, Progressive Field is the 13th oldest facility in the majors). Did the Tribe Win Last Night has compiled a list of the 20 most memorable moments in the field’s history. We’ll count them down for 20 consecutive Saturdays.

14. Snowpening Day 2007

The Indians had won two of their first three games to begin the 2007 season, but when they returned to Cleveland from the South Side of Chicago, they found less than ideal conditions for baseball. It was, however, the kind of conditions for which football games have become legendary.

It was windy and snowing. The home opener was scheduled to start at 1 p.m. on Friday, April 6, 2007, but the start time was pushed back almost an hour. News accounts referred to Jacobs Field as the world’s largest snow globe. There were game stoppages throughout, but Paul Byrd – signed as a back-end starter for the Indians before the 2006 season – was working on a no-hitter.

Read More