Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

Did The Tribe Win Last Night? | October 23, 2021

Scroll to top

Top

Mark Shapiro

A Thirst Never Quenched

November 18, 2012 |

Recently, Pat McManamon of FOXSportsOhio.com had a conversation with Cleveland Indians’ team president Mark Shapiro, who talked about his challenges and interests in baseball, the recent history of the team, and his vision moving forward. Following will be a series of opinions and insight about Shapiro’s responses and how they apply to where the team was, how the team got to where it is now, and most importantly, Where Do the Indians Go From Here.

This is part four in the series – part one; part two; part three.

By Bob Toth

What on earth happened to the Cleveland Indians in 2012?

Last season will be one of those years that leaves a bitter, unfulfilled taste in fans’ mouths and the question of “what if?” the season had lived up to the expectations that so many people had for the team prior to its start.

That which could go wrong did go wrong for the team. The moves the team made did not work out. The moves the team did not make did not work out. The team was constructed in a manner in which they needed maximum effort from all of their players for 162 games, and any injuries, slumps, or identity crises were going to severely endanger the team’s postseason chances.

When trying to come up with positives about the season, it has been extremely difficult to come up with definitive examples.

Read More

Learning from the Past

November 11, 2012 |

Recently, Pat McManamon of FOXSportsOhio.com had a conversation with Cleveland Indians’ team president Mark Shapiro, who talked about his challenges and interests in baseball, the recent history of the team, and his vision moving forward. Following will be a series of opinions and insight about Shapiro’s responses and how they apply to where the team was, how the team got to where it is now, and most importantly, Where Do the Indians Go From Here.

This is part three in the series – part one; part two.

By Bob Toth

One of the biggest keys to the Cleveland Indians’ success of the 1990’s was acquiring the right talent, whether it was through the draft, trades, or free agency.

Every team will have its share of misses. They too will have their share of surprise prospects rising through the system and making unexpected contributions to the major league squad.

When you start having repeated failures in any one or more of these areas of your organization, the entire unit becomes unstable.

Read More

Holding On To The Past

November 4, 2012 |

Recently, Pat McManamon of FOXSportsOhio.com had a conversation with Cleveland Indians’ team president Mark Shapiro, who talked about his challenges and interests in baseball, the recent history of the team, and his vision moving forward. Following will be a series of opinions and insight about Shapiro’s responses and how they apply to where the team was, how the team got to where it is now, and most importantly, Where Do the Indians Go From Here.

This is part two in the series.

By Bob Toth

When considering where one is going, it can often be beneficial to recognize where one has been.

Cleveland Indians’ team president Mark Shapiro knows this.

Read More

The Challenges Facing Shapiro

October 28, 2012 |

Recently, Pat McManamon of FOXSportsOhio.com had a conversation with Cleveland Indians’ team president Mark Shapiro, who talked about his challenges and interests in baseball, the recent history of the team, and his vision moving forward. Following will be a series of opinions and insight about Shapiro’s responses and how they apply to where the team was, how the team got to where it is now, and most importantly, Where Do the Indians Go From Here.

 

This is part one in the series.

While Major League Baseball and its fans watch the culmination of the 2012 season in Detroit as the Tigers trail the San Francisco Giants in the World Series, Mark Shapiro and the Cleveland Indians’ front office continue their work seeking ways to improve upon a disappointing season.

Their work is cut out for them.

Read More

Indians Officially Hire Terry Francona

October 8, 2012 |

By Mike Brandyberry

Monday morning the Cleveland Indians officially hired Terry Francona as the franchise’s 42 manager in their 113 year career. Francona brings more than 30 years of professional baseball experience as a player, coach and manager.

Francona has twelve years of Major League managerial experience, having compiled a record of 1029-915 (.529), and previously guided the Philadelphia Phillies over four seasons from 1997-2000. His 744 wins with the Red Sox rank second in the 112-year history of the Boston American League franchise and he has received BBWAA Manager of the Year votes in six different seasons during his 12-year big league managerial career. His 1029 wins currently rank 7th among active Major League managers. He signed a four year contract as the Indians manager.

“As excited as we are about those accomplishments, I think what excites us most are what those accomplishments are built upon,” Indians General Manager Chris Antonetti said when introducing Francona. “Terry is a exceptional leader, has boundless energy, is a relentless communicator and brings a winning attitude.”

Read More

What Francona Does and Doesn’t Bring to the Tribe

October 7, 2012 |

After a disappointing 2012 Cleveland Indians season the organization is at a crossroads to decide how to progress with the organization, not just for the 2013 season but several seasons to come. Decisions involve ownerships, the front office, managerial and coaching decisions and the players. For the month of October, we’ll look at the how the Indians ended up in their current predicament, but most importantly, Where Do the Indians Go From Here.

Saturday evening, the Cleveland Indians announced they named Terry Francona the 42nd manager in franchise history. While fans are excited to see the organization find a leader with a proven track record, they should be careful of assuming what the managerial signing signifies.

Read More

Long Term Front Office Success Has Been Overshadowed by Short Term Failures

October 6, 2012 |

After a disappointing 2012 Cleveland Indians season the organization is at a crossroads to decide how to progress with the organization, not just for the 2013 season but several seasons to come. Decisions involve ownerships, the front office, managerial and coaching decisions and the players. For the month of October, we’ll look at the how the Indians ended up in their current predicament, but most importantly, Where Do the Indians Go From Here.

At the end of any season a team is evaluated by their wins and losses, versus the expectations set before the season. In 2012, those expectations were set high and the accomplishments were low. Whenever expectations aren’t met, there is plenty of blame to go around.

A large part of that blame rests directly at the steps Team President Mark Shapiro and General Manager Chris Antonetti. Despite support from ownership—still impressed by their long term accomplishments of building an organization—fans are frustrated with the recent decisions that helped lead to a disappointing 2012.

The 2012 campaign started with promise. The Tribe was an outside shot at the playoffs, especially with the new format of two wild card teams, and the hot start of last season was fresh in the minds of Cleveland fans. This season started off rocky, blowing an Opening Day lead in the ninth inning to the Toronto Blue Jays, but the Indians bounced back to win eleven of their next eighteen games.

Read More

Examining the Indians Ownership and the Front Office Message Heading Forward

October 5, 2012 | | One Comment

After a disappointing 2012 Cleveland Indians season the organization is at a crossroads to decide how to progress with the organization, not just for the 2013 season but several seasons to come. Decisions involve ownerships, the front office, managerial and coaching decisions and the players. For the month of October, we’ll look at the how the Indians ended up in their current predicament, but most importantly, Where Do the Indians Go From Here.

Years ago, I was told by a school superintendent, “perception is everything.” It doesn’t matter to the public what is true or not, once the perception is there. If you are in the public eye, always worry about your own personal perception.

The Indians have an image problem in Cleveland. The perception is the Indians don’t spend money, pinch pennies and don’t make those bold moves to compete in the billion dollar business of baseball, while pocketing money through revenue sharing.

In a town that has three last place teams, even after a 68-94 season concluded Wednesday night, a fan could argue the Indians have the best nucleus on the field and opportunity to succeed in town. While Major League Baseball is far from a perfect system, the Cleveland Cavaliers are slowly rebuilding and the Cleveland Browns are mired in their second straight decade of ineptitude, yet the Indians remain as the least trusted and respected franchise in Cleveland.

The disconnect and lack of trust begins at the top.

Read More

Where Do the Indians Go From Here?

October 4, 2012 |

Well, that didn’t go as planned.

When the Cleveland Indians left Goodyear, Ariz., at the end of March, expectations were high. The team was coming off an 80-82 season in 2011 that could have been much better had injuries in the second half of the season not taken their toll. Now, with a healthy team in place and a young group of players with a season of contention under their belts, 2012 was supposed to be a season to compete for the playoffs.

Six months later, those predictions of playoff baseball all seem foolish now.

After a good start, the Indians found themselves 37-33 after 70 games and a half game in first place. The plan seemed to be working.

But 71 games later, the plan had been exposed, the wheels had fallen off the tracks and the Indians were in last place. It’s one of the fastest falls from the top spot to the bottom in baseball history. At 68-94, the Indians narrowly missed being only the third team in baseball history to finish in last place after leading the division at the 70-game mark.

Chris Antonetti’s plan to resign Grady Sizemore, sign Casey Kotchman and entrust left field, third base and first base to a collection of veteran journeymen or stars past their prime didn’t work. The offense faltered, most notably against left-handed pitching. The team hit .235 against southpaws for the season and was only 18-36 when a lefty started against them.

“I can tell you I’m accountable for those decisions,” Antonetti said last Thursday. “Certainly many of the decisions we made haven’t worked out as well as we hoped.”

Read More