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Did The Tribe Win Last Night? | October 21, 2021

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Jack Graney

League, City Plunged into Mourning after Chapman’s Death

August 17, 2020 |

This story was originally published on December 26, 2014, as part of a series of stories by Did The Tribe Win Last Night’s Vince Guerrieri on the Indians’ 1920 season. You can find this original story and more categorized on the site under 1920: Tragedy and Triumph. – BT

Tris Speaker didn’t sleep a wink the night Ray Chapman died. He stayed up in his room, along with Jack Graney and Steve O’Neill, hoping for the best but fearing the worst. Their worst fears were confirmed when Raymond Johnson Chapman died at 4:40 a.m., August 17, 1920.

The team visited the mortuary that day for a viewing. Graney and O’Neill passed out. Chapman’s teammates wept as they recollected his playing skill and his sunny disposition.

“It is not the baseball player I mourn,” Speaker said. “It is the pal, the truest pal man ever had.”

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After the 1920 Championship Season

February 27, 2015 |

The 1920 World Championship was the high mark for the Indians, who had reached baseball’s pinnacle after finishing second in the previous two years. It wouldn’t last.

The Yankees’ purchase of Babe Ruth was a game changer. The speed that people thought was lacking on the team as the season dawned turned out to be unnecessary, as it was more than replaced by power. Ruth ended the season with 54 home runs, and would hit 50 or more in a season four more times, including setting the record of 60 in 1927. With six pennants and three World Series wins in the next decade, the Yankees would become the power of the American League for the better part of the next half-century.

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League, city plunged into mourning after Chapman’s death

December 26, 2014 |

Tris Speaker didn’t sleep a wink the night Ray Chapman died. He stayed up in his room, along with Jack Graney and Steve O’Neill, hoping for the best but fearing the worst. Their worst fears were confirmed when Ray Chapman died at 4:40 a.m., Aug. 17, 1920.

The team visited the mortuary that day for a viewing. Graney and O’Neill passed out. Chapman’s teammates wept as they recollected his playing skill and his sunny disposition.

“It is not the baseball player I mourn,” Speaker said. “It is the pal, the truest pal man ever had.”

Read More

Homestand Begins Amid Tribe Tragedy

December 9, 2014 |

On May 28, the Indians stopped in Pittsburgh for an exhibition game against the Pirates at Forbes Field. In-season exhibitions were surprisingly common during the year, and it wouldn’t be the last one the Tribe would play in the 1920 … Read More

Heroes of 1920 On Hand to see Tribe take Game Three

March 15, 2014 |

October 9, 1948

It was the first World Series game that triple play man Bill Wambsganss had seen since his Cleveland Indians defeated the Brooklyn Robins in Game Seven in 1920.  The grand slam man, Elmer Smith, had seen a few since, however.

“This is the first series I’ve seen since our 1920 victory,” Wamby said in an article originally from The Plain Dealer.  “Elmer, of course, played in two other series’ with the New York Yankees.”

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