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Did The Tribe Win Last Night? | October 27, 2020

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Bob Feller

Tribe Has High Hopes, but Still Chasing Yankees and Red Sox as Season Starts

September 21, 2013 |

Today is the fourth and final preview story of the Did The Tribe Win Last Night 1948 project. The DTTWLN staff will begin the #48Replay on September 22 with daily posts and tweets as if the 1948 season were live action. We encourage our readers to enjoy the 1948 season all winter long, in addition to our regular Tribe coverage.

April 20, 1948

When the Indians take the field this afternoon, the likely largest opening day crowd ever will see a team with many changes from the 1947 season. Even this morning, manager Lou Boudreau still is uncertain of his starting lineup.

The new look Cleveland Indians have 14 new members on the team from a season ago. The Indians will look to improve upon their 80-74 record from a year ago that landed them in fourth place in the American League, 25 games behind the World Series Champion New York Yankees. With rumor of Boudreau possibly being traded last offseason, the Indians have higher expectations than a mediocre finish.

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Feller All-Time Greatest Indians Pitcher

September 11, 2013 |

By Ronnie Tellalian

A statue stands in a courtyard out in front of Gate C at Progressive Field in Cleveland. It depicts a hero that remained loyal to a much maligned city for 70 years. I don’t call him a hero because he was a Hall of Fame baseball player or because he was the greatest and most beloved Indians of all-time. I call him a hero because he was one. In 1941 Bob Feller was driving back from Iowa after visiting his terminally ill father. He was on his way to sign a new contract with the Cleveland Indians, when a news report came over the radio announcing the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Two days later, Feller became the first American professional athlete to enlist to fight in World War II. The military was willing to give him an exemption from combat due to his fathers ailing health, but Feller would not accept it.

“I told them I wanted to get into combat; wanted to do something besides standing around handing out balls and bats and making ball fields out of coral reefs,” Feller said.

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It’s Time to Bring Cleveland a Winner

September 1, 2013 |

Cleveland needs a winner.

Cleveland sports fans are unique in many ways, loyal to their teams when most fans would have abandoned ship a long time ago. The town has not had a playoff team in any sport since 2010 and hosts a generation of heartache for most fans that dates back to the early 1980s. It seems ESPN and other sports networks have Cleveland’s pain saved in their reels and ready to press play as soon as it becomes applicable again.

But there was a time when Cleveland was on top of the sports world. The major markets weren’t quite good enough to take down Cleveland in hockey, football or baseball, and the city held championships in each sport.

The year was 1948.

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Feller’s Second No-Hitter Was His Best

August 27, 2013 |

Can one no-hitter be better than another? In the eyes of Indians legend Bob Feller, he believes so.

Feller threw his second of three no-hitters on April 30, 1946—exactly 67 years ago today.

His first of the three came on Opening Day 1940 against the Chicago White Sox, a game that Feller is quick to dismiss. His second, he says, is the one that deserves the attention.

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Feller’s Second No-Hitter Was His Best

April 30, 2013 |

Can one no-hitter be better than another? In the eyes of Indians legend Bob Feller, he believes so.

Feller threw his second of three no-hitters on April 30, 1946—exactly 67 years ago today.

His first of the three came on Opening Day 1940 against the Chicago White Sox, a game that Feller is quick to dismiss. His second, he says, is the one that deserves the attention.

“The no-hitter on opening day in Chicago is the one that gets all the attention,” Feller said in a 2010 USA Today article. “But my no-hitter at Yankee Stadium was against a much better team than the White Sox.”

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Feller Opening Day No-Hitter Remains the Only of its Kind

April 2, 2013 |

The edition of the Cleveland Plain Dealer published April 17, 1940 contained 28 pages and cost 3 cents. Headlines were strewn across the page like someone spilled a basket of words and pasted them wherever they landed.

One of the headlines read “NAZI PLANES ROAR NORTH IN STREAM,” in all capital letters. Buried further down on the front page, another headline said “Cuyahoga Poll Backs Kennedy For Governor.” But pasted at the top, in bold capital letters that spanned all eight columns, one headline screamed “FELLER HURLS NO-HITTER TO WIN, 1 TO 0.”

The day before was April 16, 1940, just another opening day for the Chicago White Sox. The 32,000 seats in Comiskey Park were filled with only 14,000 fans on what Cleveland Plain Dealer writer Gordon Cobbledick described as a “chilly afternoon.”

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Feller All-Time Greatest Indian on All-Time Team

November 29, 2012 |

By Ronnie Tellalian

A statue stands in a courtyard out in front of Gate C at Progressive Field in Cleveland. It depicts a hero that remained loyal to a much maligned city for 70 years. I don’t call him a hero because he was a Hall of Fame baseball player or because he was the greatest and most beloved Indians of all-time. I call him a hero because he was one. In 1941 Bob Feller was driving back from Iowa after visiting his terminally ill father. He was on his way to sign a new contract with the Cleveland Indians, when a news report came over the radio announcing the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Two days later, Feller became the first American professional athlete to enlist to fight in World War II. The military was willing to give him an exemption from combat due to his fathers ailing health, but Feller would not accept it.

“I told them I wanted to get into combat; wanted to do something besides standing around handing out balls and bats and making ball fields out of coral reefs,” Feller said.

Read More