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Did The Tribe Win Last Night? | October 16, 2021

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1948: When Boudreau Led the Boys

A New Role and New Position Greets Doby

September 23, 2013 |

April 19, 1948

If Larry Doby has not endured enough change in the last nine months, here is a little more.

Tomorrow, when the Indians open the season against the St. Louis Browns, Doby is expected to be in the starting lineup in right field, a position he has never played in the Major Leagues or the Negro Leagues. After breaking the American League color barrier last season, Doby is being expected to make a larger impact on this season’s Cleveland lineup.

When the Indians left for Spring Training, they had eight contenders for their three starting outfield spots. It was perceived that Doby was eighth on the list of the contenders to make the team. However, according to Indians manager Lou Boudreau, Doby made the team, “because he hustled the others right off the field.”

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A New View for Harder With Tribe

September 23, 2013 |

April 19, 1948

When the Indians take the field tomorrow afternoon to open the 1948 season, Mel Harder will begin the season in the same place he has every year since 1937 — on the bench. However, this year it likely will be a different feeling than he’s ever felt before, yet one he has demonstrated comfort in for years.

If No. 18 strides to the mound tomorrow, it won’t be in relief of Indians ace Bob Feller, it will be to offer advice or talk strategy. After 20 seasons in an Indians uniform, this year Harder no longer is on the active roster; he is in his first year as the Tribe’s pitching coach.

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Boudreau Opens Season on Veeck’s Hot Seat

September 22, 2013 |

April 18, 1948

Cleveland fans are nothing if not loyal to their Tribe and its players. Their loyalty might have saved Lou Boudreau’s job and earned themselves a few beers this offseason.

Last October, during the World Series, it is believed Indians owner Bill Veeck floated the idea of trading Boudreau to the St. Louis Browns during the winter. After hitting .307 and leading the American League with 45 doubles in 1947, Boudreau’s value as a player has never been higher. His third-place finish for the AL Most Valuable Player award confirms the notion.

The discussion, allegedly at Toots Shor’s restaurant in Manhattan, was off the record, but eventually found its way into a Chicago newspaper. Boudreau’s hometown newspaper was surprised by the rumor, but when the Cleveland media found out, fans were outraged.

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Tribe Has High Hopes, but Still Chasing Yankees and Red Sox as Season Starts

September 21, 2013 |

Today is the fourth and final preview story of the Did The Tribe Win Last Night 1948 project. The DTTWLN staff will begin the #48Replay on September 22 with daily posts and tweets as if the 1948 season were live action. We encourage our readers to enjoy the 1948 season all winter long, in addition to our regular Tribe coverage.

April 20, 1948

When the Indians take the field this afternoon, the likely largest opening day crowd ever will see a team with many changes from the 1947 season. Even this morning, manager Lou Boudreau still is uncertain of his starting lineup.

The new look Cleveland Indians have 14 new members on the team from a season ago. The Indians will look to improve upon their 80-74 record from a year ago that landed them in fourth place in the American League, 25 games behind the World Series Champion New York Yankees. With rumor of Boudreau possibly being traded last offseason, the Indians have higher expectations than a mediocre finish.

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A New Role and New Position Greets Doby

September 20, 2013 |

Today is the third preview story of the Did The Tribe Win Last Night 1948 project. The DTTWLN staff will begin the #48Replay on September 22 with daily posts and tweets as if the 1948 season were live action. We encourage our readers to enjoy the 1948 season all winter long, in addition to our regular Tribe coverage.

April 19, 1948

If Larry Doby has not endured enough change in the last nine months, here is a little more.

Tomorrow, when the Indians open the season against the St. Louis Browns, Doby is expected to be in the starting lineup in right field, a position he has never played in the Major Leagues or the Negro Leagues. After breaking the American League color barrier last season, Doby is being expected to make a larger impact on this season’s Cleveland lineup.

Read More

A New View for Harder With Tribe

September 18, 2013 |

This is the second preview story of the Did The Tribe Win Last Night 1948 project. The DTTWLN staff will begin the #48Replay on September 22 with daily posts and tweets as if the 1948 season were live action. We encourage our readers to enjoy the 1948 season all winter long, in addition to our regular Tribe coverage.

April 19, 1948

When the Indians take the field tomorrow afternoon to open the 1948 season, Mel Harder will begin the season in the same place he has every year since 1937 — on the bench. However, this year it likely will be a different feeling than he’s ever felt before, yet one he has demonstrated comfort in for years.

If No. 18 strides to the mound tomorrow, it won’t be in relief of Indians ace Bob Feller, it will be to offer advice or talk strategy. After 20 seasons in an Indians uniform, this year Harder no longer is on the active roster; he is in his first year as the Tribe’s pitching coach.

Read More

Boudreau Opens Season on Veeck’s Hot Seat

September 17, 2013 |

This is the first preview story of the Did The Tribe Win Last Night 1948 project. The DTTWLN staff will begin the #48Replay on September 22 with daily posts and tweets as if the 1948 season were live action. We encourage our readers to enjoy the 1948 season all winter long, in addition to our regular Tribe coverage.

April 18, 1948

Cleveland fans are nothing if not loyal to their Tribe and its players. Their loyalty might have saved Lou Boudreau’s job and earned themselves a few beers this offseason.

Last October, during the World Series, it is believed Indians owner Bill Veeck floated the idea of trading Boudreau to the St. Louis Browns during the winter. After hitting .307 and leading the American League with 45 doubles in 1947, Boudreau’s value as a player has never been higher. His third-place finish for the AL Most Valuable Player award confirms the notion.

Read More

Feller All-Time Greatest Indians Pitcher

September 11, 2013 |

By Ronnie Tellalian

A statue stands in a courtyard out in front of Gate C at Progressive Field in Cleveland. It depicts a hero that remained loyal to a much maligned city for 70 years. I don’t call him a hero because he was a Hall of Fame baseball player or because he was the greatest and most beloved Indians of all-time. I call him a hero because he was one. In 1941 Bob Feller was driving back from Iowa after visiting his terminally ill father. He was on his way to sign a new contract with the Cleveland Indians, when a news report came over the radio announcing the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Two days later, Feller became the first American professional athlete to enlist to fight in World War II. The military was willing to give him an exemption from combat due to his fathers ailing health, but Feller would not accept it.

“I told them I wanted to get into combat; wanted to do something besides standing around handing out balls and bats and making ball fields out of coral reefs,” Feller said.

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14—The True Story of a Forgotten American Legend

September 11, 2013 | | One Comment

With the release of 42 this weekend in movie theaters across America, we should all be reminded of Cleveland’s own barrier breaker.  He’s the one who took the second step; the one who baseball history often seems to forget.  He’s the man who doesn’t get the credit that he deserves and is one of America’s true heroes. He is Larry Doby.

Doby is baseball’s version of Buzz Aldrin—the man who climbed down the ladder right after Neil Armstrong’s historic first walk on the moon.  Doby climbed down baseball’s color barrier ladder a mere six weeks after Jackie Robinson did, as he became the second black player in baseball history.  Outside of Cleveland, however, Doby is mostly a forgotten man.

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Harder a Member of Tribe for Several Decades

September 5, 2013 |

There is only one player in Major League history to both play and coach for 20 plus years. He is also the only eligible player not in the Hall of Fame that played for 20 or more years with the same ball club. At the time he retired in 1947, he was the Indians all time leader in wins, games started, and innings pitched. I had the honor of meeting him at a fundraiser for my baseball team back in 1996. A man I didn’t know was escorted into the room in a wheelchair. He appeared frail and old, but he had strength and joy in his eyes. He was introduced to me as Indians legend Mel Harder.

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Boudreau Gets Crafty vs. Ted Williams

August 28, 2013 |

On July 14, 1946, Ted Williams was tearing the cover off the ball against the Indians.

In the first half of a doubleheader at Fenway Park, Williams knocked in eight runs, and the Red Sox needed every one of them in an 11-10 win over the Tribe. In the second game, Indians player-manager Lou Boudreau had an idea.

Left fielder George Case was left in his position, while Boudreau and third baseman Ken Keltner moved over to the right side of the infield. First baseman Jimmy Wasdell was right down the line, third baseman Ken Keltner was just inside second base, and Boudreau was between them. Second baseman Jack Conway was in shallow right, behind Wasdell.

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Keltner’s Glove Helped End Dimaggio’s Hit Streak

August 28, 2013 |

On May 15, 1941, Joe DiMaggio began a hitting streak with a single against the Chicago White Sox. Two months later, DiMaggio’s streak had stretched to 56 games when he smashed a double and two singles against the Cleveland Indians at League Park on July 16, 1941.  DiMaggio had overtaken the modern major league record of 41 games by George Sisler, and Wee Willie Keeler’s ancient mark of 44 games.

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