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Did The Tribe Win Last Night? | January 27, 2022

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1948: When Boudreau Led the Boys

A New Role and New Position Greets Doby

September 20, 2013 |

Today is the third preview story of the Did The Tribe Win Last Night 1948 project. The DTTWLN staff will begin the #48Replay on September 22 with daily posts and tweets as if the 1948 season were live action. We encourage our readers to enjoy the 1948 season all winter long, in addition to our regular Tribe coverage.

April 19, 1948

If Larry Doby has not endured enough change in the last nine months, here is a little more.

Tomorrow, when the Indians open the season against the St. Louis Browns, Doby is expected to be in the starting lineup in right field, a position he has never played in the Major Leagues or the Negro Leagues. After breaking the American League color barrier last season, Doby is being expected to make a larger impact on this season’s Cleveland lineup.

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A New View for Harder With Tribe

September 18, 2013 |

This is the second preview story of the Did The Tribe Win Last Night 1948 project. The DTTWLN staff will begin the #48Replay on September 22 with daily posts and tweets as if the 1948 season were live action. We encourage our readers to enjoy the 1948 season all winter long, in addition to our regular Tribe coverage.

April 19, 1948

When the Indians take the field tomorrow afternoon to open the 1948 season, Mel Harder will begin the season in the same place he has every year since 1937 — on the bench. However, this year it likely will be a different feeling than he’s ever felt before, yet one he has demonstrated comfort in for years.

If No. 18 strides to the mound tomorrow, it won’t be in relief of Indians ace Bob Feller, it will be to offer advice or talk strategy. After 20 seasons in an Indians uniform, this year Harder no longer is on the active roster; he is in his first year as the Tribe’s pitching coach.

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Boudreau Opens Season on Veeck’s Hot Seat

September 17, 2013 |

This is the first preview story of the Did The Tribe Win Last Night 1948 project. The DTTWLN staff will begin the #48Replay on September 22 with daily posts and tweets as if the 1948 season were live action. We encourage our readers to enjoy the 1948 season all winter long, in addition to our regular Tribe coverage.

April 18, 1948

Cleveland fans are nothing if not loyal to their Tribe and its players. Their loyalty might have saved Lou Boudreau’s job and earned themselves a few beers this offseason.

Last October, during the World Series, it is believed Indians owner Bill Veeck floated the idea of trading Boudreau to the St. Louis Browns during the winter. After hitting .307 and leading the American League with 45 doubles in 1947, Boudreau’s value as a player has never been higher. His third-place finish for the AL Most Valuable Player award confirms the notion.

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14—The True Story of a Forgotten American Legend

September 11, 2013 | | One Comment

With the release of 42 this weekend in movie theaters across America, we should all be reminded of Cleveland’s own barrier breaker.  He’s the one who took the second step; the one who baseball history often seems to forget.  He’s the man who doesn’t get the credit that he deserves and is one of America’s true heroes. He is Larry Doby.

Doby is baseball’s version of Buzz Aldrin—the man who climbed down the ladder right after Neil Armstrong’s historic first walk on the moon.  Doby climbed down baseball’s color barrier ladder a mere six weeks after Jackie Robinson did, as he became the second black player in baseball history.  Outside of Cleveland, however, Doby is mostly a forgotten man.

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Boudreau Gets Crafty vs. Ted Williams

August 28, 2013 |

On July 14, 1946, Ted Williams was tearing the cover off the ball against the Indians.

In the first half of a doubleheader at Fenway Park, Williams knocked in eight runs, and the Red Sox needed every one of them in an 11-10 win over the Tribe. In the second game, Indians player-manager Lou Boudreau had an idea.

Left fielder George Case was left in his position, while Boudreau and third baseman Ken Keltner moved over to the right side of the infield. First baseman Jimmy Wasdell was right down the line, third baseman Ken Keltner was just inside second base, and Boudreau was between them. Second baseman Jack Conway was in shallow right, behind Wasdell.

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Keltner’s Glove Helped End Dimaggio’s Hit Streak

August 28, 2013 |

On May 15, 1941, Joe DiMaggio began a hitting streak with a single against the Chicago White Sox. Two months later, DiMaggio’s streak had stretched to 56 games when he smashed a double and two singles against the Cleveland Indians at League Park on July 16, 1941.  DiMaggio had overtaken the modern major league record of 41 games by George Sisler, and Wee Willie Keeler’s ancient mark of 44 games.

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Hegan a Player of a Different Era

August 23, 2013 |

The modern era would be far more cruel to a player like Jim Hegan.

The Tribe catcher for 14 seasons—11 of which were as the Tribe’s starter—may never have been more than a back up player or someone with a limited ceiling in today’s game because he lacked the offense to produce. Hegan’s intangibles proved more valuable than his bat, however.

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Tigers Legend Helped Build Indians of the 1950s

August 23, 2013 |

He was the original Hammerin’ Hank. In the less enlightened time when he played, he was also known as the Hebrew Hammer.

But after a lengthy and successful career – almost exclusively with the Detroit Tigers – Hank Greenberg came to Cleveland and left his mark on the Indians.

After the 1947 season – the only one he played with the Pittsburgh Pirates – Greenberg’s playing career ended. He retired with a career .313 batting average and 331 home runs – a number which could have vastly increased had Greenberg not lost the bulk of four seasons to service in the Army Air Forces in World War II.

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Lemon Transforms to Pitching Great

August 21, 2013 |

He started out as a third baseman for the Indians, getting a cup of coffee in the majors before serving in the Navy in World War II. But Bob Lemon became a pitcher after the war – and one of the best of his era.

In 1946, he was the Tribe’s opening day center fielder, but he went 4-5 as a pitcher, the only losing season he’d have on the mound until 1957. Lemon won 20 games in a season seven times, including 1948, when the Indians won the World Series, and 1954, when they won the pennant. In his career, Lemon led the American League in complete games five times, innings pitched four times, wins three times and shutouts and strikeouts once each.

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