Boudreau Steals Home, Zoldak Steals Show; Indians 6, Red Sox 1

August 1, 1948

When the Cleveland Indians traded Bill Kennedy to the St. Louis Browns in June, this is the version of Sam Zoldak that they wanted to get back.

Zoldak (6-7, 3.81) was outstanding in game two of Sunday’s doubleheader, pitching arguably his best game as an Indian. Zoldak threw a complete game, one-run, seven-hitter to lead the Indians to a 6-1 victory over Boston. The win moves the Tribe percentage points ahead of the Red Sox and vaults the Indians into second place, one game behind front-running Philadelphia.

The Red Sox, who came into Cleveland as the hottest team in baseball and winners of 22 of 27, left limping out of town after losing three of four games. Sunday evening, the BoSox put their faiths in left-hander Mickey Harris (3-8, 6.46), who continued his season-long struggles by allowing four runs in seven innings. Included in the four Tribe tallies were home runs by Joe Gordon and Allie Clark.

The Indians literally stole the lead in the bottom of the second, when Lou Boudreau worked a one-out walk and moved to third on an Eddie Robinson single. Boudreau then got a signal from third base coach Bill McKechnie that allowed him to attempt baseball’s most exciting play.

“I got the wink from ‘Pops’ [McKechnie] and decided to give it a try,” Boudreau said in an article originally from the Plain Dealer.

The normally slow-footed Boudreau took off on Harris’ first movement and dashed toward home, stealing it successfully. On the play, Robinson swiped second base as well.

“Harris was taking a long stretch,” Boudreau said. “He would glance at third, look at first and then throw…First time I ever did it.”

The run gave the Tribe a 1-0 advantage and set the tone for the remainder of the game.

The Indians added to their lead in the sixth inning, when Gordon took Harris deep after Ken Keltner had singled. Clark made the score 4-0 in favor of Cleveland when he did the same in the bottom of the seventh. The Tribe then added their final two runs in the eighth inning, thanks in large part to some shaky Boston execution.

Red Sox reliever Tex Hughson walked Keltner to lead off the inning and then retired Gordon on a groundout. Boudreau then lifted a ball to right fielder Sam Mele, who misplayed it for an error, and Keltner came around from second to score. Boudreau then touched home when Robinson drove him in with a single and a 6-0 Tribe lead. Boston added their run in the top of the ninth, when Ted Williams crushed a leadoff homer off of Zoldak.

The Indians will take Monday off and then host the Washington Senators at the Stadium through Thursday. Newest Indian Satchel Paige (1-1, 2.00) will take the bump for the Indians opposite former All-Star Early Wynn (7-11, 5.44) in the first game of the series.

Photo: stuffnobodycaresabout.com

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