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Did The Tribe Win Last Night? | October 16, 2018

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Wayne Kirby

Today in Tribe History: June 12, 1995

June 12, 2018 |

The Cleveland Indians, off to an incredible start, sell out Jacobs Field for the sixth time this season. More notably, it will begin the team’s long streak of 455 consecutive home sellouts lasting through April 4, 2001. Read More

Today in Tribe History: April 4, 1994

April 4, 2018 |

It was a special day in the city of Cleveland as the Indians and the Seattle Mariners opened up the brand new Jacobs Field in front of a packed house of 41,459 spectators. Fans who attended the historic event were treated to a classic season opener, as the Indians edged the Mariners, 4-3, with an eleventh inning walk-off. Read More

Countdown to Indians’ Opening Day – 35

February 22, 2018 |

While the offseason has been historically slow and the winter has crawled along at an even slower pace, we at Did The Tribe Win Last Night look ahead to the warmer days of the 2018 season by remembering Tribe players past and present.

Countdown to Opening Day – 35 days

It would appear as though Abraham Almonte will get an opportunity to return to the Indians outfield in 2018 wearing his familiar number 35, something that he has done in more years than just a handful of players in club history. Heading into this season, only Wayne Kirby, Enrique Wilson, and Tom Buskey had spent more than three years in the 35. Read More

Today in Tribe History: June 12, 1995

June 12, 2017 |

The Cleveland Indians, off to an incredible start, sell out Jacobs Field for the sixth time this season. More notably, it will begin the team’s long streak of 455 consecutive home sellouts lasting through April 4, 2001. Read More

Today in Tribe History: April 4, 1994

April 4, 2017 |

It was a special day in the city of Cleveland as the Indians and the Seattle Mariners opened up the brand new Jacobs Field in front of a packed house of 41,459 spectators. Fans who attended the historic event were treated to a classic season opener, as the Indians edged the Mariners, 4-3, with an eleventh inning walk-off. Read More

Today in Tribe History: April 4, 1994

April 4, 2016 |

It is a special day in the city of Cleveland as the Indians and the Seattle Mariners open up the brand new Jacobs Field in front of a packed house of 41,459 spectators. Fans who attended the historic event are … Read More

Countdown to Indians’ Opening Day – 73: Catching Up With Wayne Kirby

January 22, 2016 |

As Did The Tribe Win Last Night helps fans count down the days until the Indians retake the field in an official Major League game, we look back at some of the greats who wore the Cleveland jersey with pride.

Countdown to Opening Day – 73 days

Yes, former outfielder Wayne Kirby is on most of the 1994/1995 highlight reels wearing his famous #35, but the now coach for the Baltimore Orioles broke into the Big Leagues with the Indians sporting #73 for 21 games in 1991. No matter the number that was on his back, Kirby always looks back on his time with the Cleveland Indians fondly.

“There’s so many memories,” Kirby said.  “I can’t pin-place just one.” Read More

Miracle on Ontario Street (1995): Tribe Comes Back on Memorial Day

December 22, 2015 |

When the 1994 major league season ended abruptly because of a players’ strike, the White Sox were atop the new American League Central Division, with the Indians just a game back and leading in the new AL wild card.

The two teams were expected to continue to contend when the 1995 season picked up, but by the time the Pale Hose made their first visit to Jacobs Field on Memorial Day, they’d fallen into the back of the pack in the division – and the Indians were atop the Central, seven games ahead of the White Sox.

The afternoon game was a bad day for Indians starting pitcher Dennis Martinez, who gave up six runs – five earned – in six innings of work, including a two-run home run to Frank Thomas and a solo shot to Robin Ventura. Read More

Memories of The Greatest Summer Ever

October 3, 2015 |

I’ll never forget the summer of 1995.

I was 13 years old, just about to enter the eighth grade and in love with the Cleveland Indians.  But I wasn’t just some fair-weather fan.  In my mind, I had dealt with the hardships of the bad years, having lived through the late 80’s and early 90’s teams that lost almost all of the time.  I couldn’t stand that it was suddenly sopopular to root for the Indians.  The words “fair weather fans” became a part of my regular vocabulary during the summer of ’95.  Where were all of you when the rest of us were all rooting for a losing team?  It wasn’t until I was in college and the glory years were almost over that I realized that I hadn’t really “dealt” with anything.

“Kids growing up (in the 90’s) and that’s all they knew…they’re in trouble,” former Indian and TV color man Rick Manning said.  “Now look at it…it’s not even close.  (The way it is now) is how Indians baseball was when I played (1975-1983) and even before me.”

People my age are spoiled.  I’m only 30-some years old and have seen the best, most exciting stretch of baseball that Cleveland has ever had.  Sure, I haven’t seen my Tribe win the ultimate prize, but heck, my father just turned 60 and has seen the exact same amount of World Series titles that I have.  We’ve seen the same amount of pennants as well, unless you count the one in 1954 when he was two (even with as big of a baseball fan as my dad is, I doubt that he was paying attention at two).

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The Greatest Summer Ever: The 10th Man

September 1, 2015 |

Throughout the 2015 season, Did the Tribe Win Last Night will take a look back at the 1995 Cleveland Indians for the 20th anniversary of their fourth pennant winning season. Included will be historic game recaps, headlining stories and a ranking of the team’s most influential players that truly made 1995 The Greatest Summer Ever. Today looks back at the influence that the Cleveland fans had on the ’95 team.

The 1995 Indians may have come up just short of their ultimate goal of winning the World Series, but you wouldn’t have known it from the outpouring of love the team received from their city.

“Everywhere you went there was Chief Wahoo in every yard,” starting pitcher Charles Nagy said. “The way the fans would come out—they would line our parking lot after the games—it was outstanding.”

“We would always feel like we had a home field advantage here with those fans that we had,” reliever Julian Tavarez added. Read More

1995 Game Recap: Belle Slam Shows California Who’s the AL’s Boss—Indians 7, Angels 5

July 18, 2015 |

Throughout the 2015 season, Did the Tribe Win Last Night will take a look back at the 1995 Cleveland Indians for the 20th anniversary of their fourth pennant winning season. Included will be historic game recaps, headlining stories and a ranking of the team’s most influential players that truly made 1995 The Greatest Summer Ever. Today looks back July 18, 1995.

Another night at Jacobs Field, another walk-off homerun. This time, however, the feeling was so, so grand.

In a season filled with excitement and late-inning heroics, Albert Belle topped them all on Tuesday night with a walk-off grand slam off Angels closer Lee Smith to give the Indians a 7-5 victory over the California Angels. The heroic slam came two days after Manny Ramirez lit up another one of baseball’s best closers, Oakland’s Dennis Eckersley. The Tribe had trailed 5-3 entering the ninth inning on Tuesday, but got a spark from the top of their batting order and a little bit of help from Lady Luck. Read More

1995 Game Recap: 3,000! Murray’s Milestone Highlights Tribe Win—Indians 4, Twins 1

June 30, 2015 |

Throughout the 2015 season, Did the Tribe Win Last Night will take a look back at the 1995 Cleveland Indians for the 20th anniversary of their fourth pennant winning season. Included will be historic game recaps, headlining stories and a ranking of the team’s most influential players that truly made 1995 The Greatest Summer Ever. Today looks back June 30, 1995.

The Indians improved baseball’s best record to 41-17 on Friday night with a 4-1 victory over the lowly Minnesota Twins, but the best team in the Major Leagues took a backseat to one of their own player’s personal milestones.

If he hadn’t already done so in his 19-year career, Tribe DH Eddie Murray stamped his ticket as a first ballot Hall of Famer with his single in the sixth inning—the 3,000th of his amazing career. The man they call “Steady Eddie” lined a fastball from Twins pitcher Mike Trombley between first and second and past a diving Chuck Knoblauch that helped start a game changing rally and made him the 20th player in Major League history to accomplish one of baseball’s rarest and best feats. Read More