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Did The Tribe Win Last Night? | October 17, 2017

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Steve O’Neill

Today in Tribe History: August 29, 1983

August 29, 2017 |

F.J. (Steve) O’Neill, the board chairman and the majority owner of the Cleveland Indians, dies from a heart attack on the way to St. Vincent Charity Hospital after waking with shortness of breath. He was 83 years old. Read More

Today in Tribe History: January 26, 1962

January 26, 2017 |

Former Indians catcher, coach, manager, and scout Steve O’Neill passes away in Cleveland. He was 70 years old. Read More

For All the Deals He’s Done, Trump Couldn’t Buy the Indians

November 9, 2016 |

Editor’s note: this story originally posted March 9, 2016.

Donald Trump and New York City go hand in hand.

From his roots in Queens to his real estate deals in Manhattan to his pronounced accent (“yuge!”), Trump is inextricably linked to the Big Apple.

But in 1983, before his bid for president, before his television show, before his marriages and divorces had become tabloid fodder, even before “The Art of the Deal,” his bestseller that made him nationally famous, Trump looked to Cleveland to expand into professional sports — like George Steinbrenner in reverse.

In what might be the funniest thing Tony Grossi’s ever written, he said, “Trump’s sudden and inexplicable interest in purchasing the Cleveland Indians evokes the image of a man who awakes in a cold sweat with the frightening realization that a billion Chinese never heard of him.” Read More

1945 World Series Featured One Former Indian – and Almost a Future One Too

November 2, 2016 |

The 1945 World Series was, until this year, the last appearance in the Fall Classic for the Chicago Cubs.

It also pitted managers against each other that represented the Indians’ past – and possibly its future.

The Tigers manager was Steve O’Neill, who was originally signed by the Athletics but played the bulk of his career for the Indians. He was a part of the 1920 championship team, and ended his career with stints in Boston, the Bronx, and St. Louis. Read More

Today in Tribe History: August 29, 1983

August 29, 2016 |

F.J. (Steve) O’Neill, the board chairman and the majority owner of the Cleveland Indians, dies from a heart attack on the way to St. Vincent Charity Hospital after waking with shortness of breath. He was 83 years old. Read More

Today in Tribe History: January 26, 1962

January 26, 2016 |

Former Indians catcher, coach, manager, and scout Steve O’Neill passes away in Cleveland. He was 70 years old.

Born in 1891 in Minooka, Pennsylvania, O’Neill reached the Majors at the age of 20 with the Cleveland Naps in 1911. He … Read More

Today in Tribe History: August 29, 1983

August 29, 2015 |

1983 – F.J. (Steve) O’Neill, the board chairman and the majority owner of the Cleveland Indians, dies from a heart attack on the way to St. Vincent Charity Hospital after waking with shortness of breath. He was 83 years old.

Read More

After the 1920 Championship Season

February 27, 2015 |

The 1920 World Championship was the high mark for the Indians, who had reached baseball’s pinnacle after finishing second in the previous two years. It wouldn’t last.

The Yankees’ purchase of Babe Ruth was a game changer. The speed that people thought was lacking on the team as the season dawned turned out to be unnecessary, as it was more than replaced by power. Ruth ended the season with 54 home runs, and would hit 50 or more in a season four more times, including setting the record of 60 in 1927. With six pennants and three World Series wins in the next decade, the Yankees would become the power of the American League for the better part of the next half-century.

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Today in Tribe History: January 26, 1962

January 26, 2015 |

Former Indians catcher, coach, manager, and scout Steve O’Neill passes away in Cleveland. He was 70 years old.

Born in 1891 in Minooka, Pennsylvania, O’Neill reached the Majors at the age of 20 with the Cleveland Naps in 1911. He eventually … Read More

League, city plunged into mourning after Chapman’s death

December 26, 2014 |

Tris Speaker didn’t sleep a wink the night Ray Chapman died. He stayed up in his room, along with Jack Graney and Steve O’Neill, hoping for the best but fearing the worst. Their worst fears were confirmed when Ray Chapman died at 4:40 a.m., Aug. 17, 1920.

The team visited the mortuary that day for a viewing. Graney and O’Neill passed out. Chapman’s teammates wept as they recollected his playing skill and his sunny disposition.

“It is not the baseball player I mourn,” Speaker said. “It is the pal, the truest pal man ever had.”

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Shortstop Chapman was Fan Favorite, Team’s Heart

November 11, 2014 |

Tris Speaker was the leader of the 1920 Indians, but the heart and soul of the team was its shortstop, a man who led singalongs in the clubhouse and smuggled baseballs out of League Park to give to kids after baseball games.

By 1920, Ray Chapman was regarded as one of the best all-around shortstops in Major League Baseball. F.C. Lane of Baseball Magazine said Chapman was as good as the legendary Honus Wagner. But after a seven-year career, Chapman was teetering on a farewell tour.

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Tribe Head to Detroit Amidst Pennant Fever

February 27, 2014 |

September 23, 1948

After last night’s win at Municipal Stadium against the Boston Red Sox, it felt like the Indians had won the pennant. The reality remains however that the Indians have a lot of work to do.

Despite permission for the commissioner to begin printing World Series tickets, the Indians have eight games remaining in a very tight pennant race. The Tribe is now tied with the Red Sox for first place and the New York Yankees remain just one game behind the top spot.

Many players and sportswriters around the league believe the Indians are the favorite to take the flag, however. Cleveland’s eight games are against second division teams, while Boston and New York play each other five times in the last eight.

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