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Did The Tribe Win Last Night? | February 26, 2020

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Ray Chapman

Today in Tribe History: January 15, 1891

January 15, 2020 |

The tragically short life of Ray Chapman begins in Beaver Dam, Kentucky. Read More

Tragedy Struck Tribe with Chapman Beaning

August 16, 2019 |

This story was originally published on December 23, 2014, as part of a series of stories by Did The Tribe Win Last Night’s Vince Guerrieri on the Indians’ 1920 season. You can find this original story and more categorized on the site under 1920: Tragedy and Triumph. – BT

After a four-game sweep by the Yankees at League Park, the Indians had watched their lead in the American League dwindle from four and a half games down to just half a game. A loss to the St. Louis Browns put the Indians half a game back of the Yankees, who were demonstrating that they didn’t need speed when they had power. The Indians were able to put an end to the five-game skid with a shutout by Bob Clark, the pitcher from Newport, Pennsylvania*, who had thrown batting practice and came on in relief in the exhibition in July against the Reds. It was Clark’s first – and only – major league win. Read More

Today in Tribe History: August 16, 1920

August 16, 2019 |

Indians shortstop Ray Chapman, 29, is hit in the head by a fastball from the Yankees’ Carl Mays in the fifth inning of a game at the Polo Grounds in New York. Read More

Today in Tribe History: January 15, 1891

January 15, 2019 |

The tragically short life of Ray Chapman begins in Beaver Dam, Kentucky. Read More

Today in Tribe History: August 16, 1920

August 16, 2018 |

Indians shortstop Ray Chapman, 29, is hit in the head by a fastball from the Yankees’ Carl Mays in the fifth inning of a game at the Polo Grounds in New York. Read More

Today in Tribe History: January 15, 1891

January 15, 2018 |

The tragically short life of Ray Chapman begins in Beaver Dam, Kentucky. Read More

Today in Tribe History: August 16, 1920

August 16, 2017 |

Indians shortstop Ray Chapman, 29, is hit in the head by a fastball from the Yankees’ Carl Mays in the fifth inning of a game at the Polo Grounds in New York. Read More

Today in Tribe History: January 15, 1891

January 15, 2017 |

The tragically short life of Ray Chapman begins in Beaver Dam, Kentucky. Read More

Tragedy Strikes with Chapman Beaning

August 17, 2016 |

This story was originally published on December 23, 2014, as part of a series of stories by Did The Tribe Win Last Night’s Vince Guerrieri on the Indians’ 1920 season. You can find this original story and more categorized on the site under 1920: Tragedy and Triumph. “He Lives In The Hearts Of All Who Knew Him.” – BT

After a four-game sweep by the Yankees at League Park, the Indians had watched their lead in the American League dwindle from four and a half games down to just half a game. A loss to the St. Louis Browns put the Indians half a game back of the Yankees, who were demonstrating that they didn’t need speed when they had power. The Indians were able to put an end to the five-game skid with a shutout by Bob Clark, the pitcher from Newport, Pennsylvania*, who had thrown batting practice and came on in relief in the exhibition in July against the Reds. It was Clark’s first – and only – major league win.

The Indians rolled into New York City for a make-or-break series with the Yankees, but they were still optimistic enough to take requests for World Series tickets. Stan Coveleski would take the mound for the Tribe in the Polo Grounds, facing submariner Carl Mays. It was an unpleasant day in Harlem, with temperatures in the 80s and humidity beyond that, but 23,000 people had shown up for the game.

Read More

Today in Tribe History: August 16, 1920

August 16, 2016 |

Twenty-nine-year-old Indians shortstop Ray Chapman is hit in the head by a fastball from the Yankees’ Carl Mays in the fifth inning of a game at the Polo Grounds in New York. Read More

Hiram Prof Offers Historic Baseball Tour Through Lake View Cemetery

April 6, 2016 |

For most Indians fans, Lake View Cemetery on the east side of Cleveland means the final resting place for Ray Chapman.

And initially, Ryan Honomichl thought that, too. But after some research, Honomichl, a psychology professor at Hiram College, is going to be giving a tour Sunday, “Batter Up,” outlining the baseball history in the cemetery. Cost is $35 for the trolley tour — which includes lunch — and can be made at the Lake View Cemetery website.

The tour will include Chapman, but also other people important not just in Cleveland baseball history, but in the history of the sport in general. Read More

Today in Tribe History: January 15, 1891

January 15, 2016 |

The tragically short life of Ray Chapman begins in Beaver Dam, Kentucky.

Chapman reached the Majors at the age of 21, playing shortstop for the Cleveland Naps in 1912. He blossomed into an every day player for the club, primarily … Read More