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Did The Tribe Win Last Night? | March 27, 2017

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Mel Harder

Countdown to Indians’ Opening Day – 18 – Mel Harder

March 16, 2017 |

Join Did The Tribe Win Last Night as we count down to Opening Day!

Countdown to Opening Day – 18 days

Of the retired numbers in Cleveland Indians history, Mel Harder’s number 18 may be one of the lesser known and more under-appreciated of the bunch to be honored in such a way. It was largely due to Harder’s misfortune of being a Cleveland Indian during some very down years for the club during the 1930s and 1940s and retiring the season before the Tribe took the 1948 World Series.

It may have been enough to cost him a place among the baseball immortals in Cooperstown’s Hall of Fame. Read More

Today in Tribe History: October 20, 2002

October 20, 2016 |

Mel Harder, who spent all 20 of his Major League seasons as a pitcher in a Cleveland Indians uniform, passes away in Chardon, Ohio, five days after celebrating his 93rd birthday. Read More

Today in Tribe History: September 7, 1935

September 7, 2016 |

Some teams have a knack for finding unique ways to win a ballgame. Such was the case for the Cleveland Indians as a game-ending triple play preserves their 5-3 win over the Boston Red Sox in game one of a doubleheader. Read More

Today in Tribe History: August 26, 1940

August 26, 2016 |

Cleveland tops Washington, 4-3, as Bob Feller’s relief work ends the rally of the Senators and keeps Ossie Vitt’s Indians in first place by three games over the Detroit Tigers. Read More

Today in Tribe History: July 31, 1932

July 31, 2016 |

The Cleveland Indians play their first game at the new Municipal Stadium, but cannot provide the paid crowd of 76,979 with a win as Mel Harder is defeated by the Philadelphia Athletics, 1-0. Read More

Top All-Star Pitching Performances by the Cleveland Indians

July 12, 2016 |

After several years of being snubbed, and nearly falling short of the American League All-Star team for a third straight year this season (despite statistically deserving consideration), Corey Kluber will finally make his long anticipated debut in the Midsummer Classic on Tuesday night when the AL team takes on the National League squad from Petco Park in San Diego, California.

The 2014 Cy Young winner nearly missed the game altogether after failing to make the initial roster. An injury to Toronto Blue Jays starting pitcher Marco Estrada got him a ticket to the game and AL manager Ned Yost has tabbed Kluber to take the mound second as the league looks to lock up home field advantage in the World Series.

His fellow starting rotation member, Danny Salazar, was selected to the team last Tuesday, but he has since bowed out of the game to rest his sore right elbow and was replaced by Chicago left-hander Jose Quintana. Indians teammate Francisco Lindor will come off of the bench for the AL at some point in the contest.

The All-Star honors were the first in the careers of all three Indians players. Read More

Today in Tribe History: May 10, 1944

May 10, 2016 |

Cleveland pitcher Mel Harder earns career win number 200 as the Indians knock off the Boston Red Sox, 5-4. Read More

After the Cleveland Indians’ 1948 Season (Part 1)

April 3, 2016 |

The 1948 World Championship was the crowning moment in Bill Veeck’s career as an owner – and one of the loneliest in his life. Veeck would own another pennant winner, but no other world champion. On September 23, 1949, he led a funeral procession out to the outfield to bury the pennant, with the Indians mathematically eliminated from the race. That fall, Veeck’s wife Eleanore filed for divorce, and Veeck was forced to sell the team to pay for it.

In 1951, Veeck, newly married, bought the St. Louis Browns. His idea was to run off the Cardinals, and with a mix of his own wacky promotions and Cardinals owner Fred Saigh’s income tax problems, it appeared he might do so. But Saigh sold the team to Gussie Busch, heir to the brewing fortune and a St. Louis institution. Veeck sought to move the team to Baltimore, but was blocked by baseball owners and was forced to sell the team – which then moved to Baltimore. Read More

Countdown to Indians’ Opening Day – 18: Mel Harder

March 17, 2016 |

As Did The Tribe Win Last Night helps fans count down the days until the Indians retake the field in an official Major League game, we look back at some of the players who wore the Cleveland jersey with pride.

Countdown to Opening Day – 18 days

Of the retired numbers in Cleveland Indians history, Mel Harder’s number 18 may be one of the lesser known and more under-appreciated of the bunch to be honored in such a way. It was largely due to Harder’s misfortune of being a Cleveland Indian during some very down years for the club during the 1930s and 1940s and retiring the season before the Tribe took the 1948 World Series.

It may have been enough to cost him a place among the baseball immortals in Cooperstown’s Hall of Fame. Read More

Feller’s Win May Finally Turn the Corner in his Season

February 16, 2016 |

August 28, 1948

Yesterday’s 8-1 victory in the first game of the Indians and Yankees doubleheader was the Tribe’s 72nd victory of the season and Bob Feller’s 171st win of his career.

While the numbers may seem insignificant in the both the season and Feller’s career, the manner in which he won the game carried a much greater magnitude. It was one felt through out the Tribe and their pennant hopes.

“A big game,” manager Lou Boudreau said. “A big game in more ways than one.” Read More

Is Something Wrong With Bob Feller?

January 15, 2016 |

July 27, 1948

In each of his last five full seasons with the Cleveland Indians, Bob Feller has been a 20-game winner. He has been an All-Star, an MVP candidate, the face of a franchise, and has routinely led the league in wins and starts.

Despite a laundry list of accolades, the 29-year-old pitcher has not appeared quite himself this year. The flame-throwing right-hander has seen more than his fair share of struggles on the mound this season. Read More

More Than 80,000 May See Yankees and Tribe Battle on Sunday

November 10, 2015 |

May 22, 1948

Tomorrow the Cleveland Indians and New York Yankees may make baseball history when the two do battle at Cleveland Stadium. It might be the largest crowd in baseball history to ever witness a game. The Indians are expecting around 80,000 for the Sunday doubleheader.

The ticket office has 30,000 general admission tickets available beginning at 9 a.m. on Sunday at the Stadium. All box and reserved seating already has been sold. Arrangements have been made to move the bullpens from beyond the outfield walls into foul ground so that fans have extra space to stand during the game. Read More