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Did The Tribe Win Last Night? | September 18, 2018

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Indians History

Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #26 Brook Jacoby

January 25, 2012 |

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we chronicle the career of Brook Jacoby.

By Kevin Schnieder

In the 1980s, I as a youngster in central Ohio, I felt close to Indians third baseman Brook Jacoby.

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Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #27 Herb Score

January 24, 2012 | | One Comment

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we chronicle the career of Herb Score.

By Kevin Schnieder

Herb Score’s career ended before it had a chance to blossom on the field.  But he stuck in Tribe fan’s hearts for decades as a radio announcer.

At just 22, the lefty score scorched his fastball in the upper 90s when he debuted with the Indians in the 1955 season and won the American League Rookie of the Year award. Score, who wore number 27 for the Indians, flung that fastball for an A.L.-high 245 strikeouts in 1955 and again led the league with 263 in 1956.

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Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #28 Cory Snyder

January 23, 2012 |

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we chronicle the career of Cory Snyder.

By Mike Brandyberry

The summer of 1986 was when I fell in love with baseball and the Cleveland Indians and found my only true favorite player ever, Cory Snyder. Originally, Snyder was the fourth overall pick in the 1984 MLB Draft after representing the USA in the inaugural baseball contest in the Olympic Games.

I was seven years old and started playing my first season of baseball. I loved it immediately, but wasn’t really good off the bat. I was normally stationed in right field, so it became natural that the first time I sat down to watch a Tribe game with my father, I wanted to know who was the right fielder.

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Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #29 Satchel Paige

January 22, 2012 |

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we chronicle the career of Satchel Paige.

In 1946, Bob Feller and Satchel Paige were the featured attractions on a barnstorming tour.

Feller was a Cleveland Indians phenom with a blazing fastball, who had just come back from service in the U.S. Navy in World War II. Paige was an ageless wonder who had pitched throughout the Negro Leagues, including Chattanooga, Pittsburgh and Kansas City. Feller said Paige was the best pitcher he ever saw.

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Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #30 Joe Carter

January 21, 2012 |

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we chronicle the career of Joe Carter.

By Mike Brandyberry

Joe Carter will live in baseball history for his World Series winning home run off of Mitch Williams in Game Six of the 1993 Series, but before he became a legend, he was a part of two significant Cleveland Indians’ trades.

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Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #31 Steve Olin

January 20, 2012 |

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we remember the short career of Steve Olin.

By Christine Bailey

Many young tribe fans may not recognize the name Steve Olin. However, for those who remember the name, may say he was a rising relief pitcher well on the way of making a name for himself in the majors. Even though I was very young when Steve Olin played for Cleveland, I do remember him.

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Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #32 Roger Maris

January 19, 2012 |

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we remember the short Indian stint of young, Roger Maris.

By Craig Gifford

In Cleveland, one well-known phrase is, “The Curse of Colavito.” It’s generally thought that when the Tribe traded Colavito to Detroit after the 1959 season, it would prevent them from winning another championship. The trade of the player who had four great seasons with the Indians has been followed by zero championships for the Indians to this point.

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Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #33 Jim Mudcat Grant

January 18, 2012 |

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we remember the career of Jim “Mudcat” Grant.

When the Indians traded Jim “Mudcat” Grant to the Twins during the 1964 season, he was worried.

The Florida native told Sports Illustrated, “The Twins kept me in the league.” He had a 22-6 career record against them. But he went on to do great things with the Twins, becoming the first black pitcher in the American League to win 20 games and to win a World Series game, doing both in 1965, when the Twins took the Dodgers to seven games before succumbing. Grant ended up getting a World Series ring with the Pirates, going 5-3 for the Bucs in 1971 in a relief role.

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Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #34 Joe Charboneau

January 17, 2012 |

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we remember the short career of Joe Charboneau.

By Craig Gifford

With the city’s last major sports championship coming in 1964, Cleveland is generally thought to be the most cursed sports town in America. The three major teams (Indians, Browns and Cavs) have all found unique ways to get oh-so-close and then break the hearts of their fans over the past 48 years.

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Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #35 Phil Niekro

January 16, 2012 |

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we remember a moment with Phil Niekro.

By Mike Brandyberry

“What’s your name, son?” Phil Niekro asked.

I was eight and stood there stunned, mouth probably open and speechless. I vaguely remember putting the sound together to tell him my first name. It was 1987, Niekro’s final year as a major leaguer and the Indians were already playing out the string in what would become another 100-loss season.

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Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #36 Gaylord Perry

January 15, 2012 |

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we chronicle the career of Gaylord Perry.

By Mike Brandyberry

His time in Cleveland was not long, but Gaylord Perry was memorable in his stay along the shores of Lake Erie. Perry was signed as a free agent by the San Francisco Giants in 1958, debuting with the club in 1962 at the age of 23. He pitched in the Bay Area for ten seasons until he was traded to the Tribe after the 1971 season.

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Ray Chapman: An Indians Legend, Part 2

January 15, 2012 | | One Comment

By Matthew Van Wormer

January 15th marks the birthday of a great Indian; Raymond Johnson Chapman.  Born in 1891, Ray played for the Indians until August 16, 1920, when a ball pitched by Carl Mays struck him in the left side of the head.  He died just 12 hours later and inspired the team to win the World Series, the first of two Championships for the Cleveland Indians.  This two part series will cover Ray Chapman from a fan’s perspective and also look at the career of two men, Chapman and Mays, who couldn’t have been more different.

Ray Chapman’s career was supposed to end in 1920, just not the way it did.  Before the season started, Chapman married Kathleen Daly who was the daughter of wealthy Cleveland businessman, Martin B. Daly.  It was insinuated by Chapman and a few people close to him that he would be retiring after the season to take a job within Daly’s successful business.  He had played nine seasons in the Major’s and was ready to be a business and family man.  Not a lot of people knew this, especially not the man who threw the pitch that killed Chapman, Carl Mays.

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