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Did The Tribe Win Last Night? | August 17, 2019

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Indians History

League Park’s Long History Looks To Add New Chapters

April 3, 2012 | | 2 Comments

By Vince Guerrieri

Cy Young opened it – twice. Babe Ruth hit his 500th home run there, and it was the site of the only unassisted triple play in World Series history. It was home to an NFL team and a practice field for another.

League Park opened as a wooden grandstand at the end of a cable car line in 1891, and 19 years later, was rebuilt as a concrete and steel ballpark. It served as the home of the Indians full-time until 1932, and then on and off until 1946. It was also the brief but successful home field for the Cleveland Buckeyes of the Negro Leagues.

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Parnell and 1948 Indians Forever Tied Together

March 29, 2012 |

 

By Vince Guerrieri

To fans in Boston and the Bronx, Mel Parnell was known as a Yankee-killer. He won 15 games against the Bombers, including four shutouts in 1953. To Red Sox fans of a different generation, Parnell was the voice of the Sox, following them during their Impossible Dream season of 1967 and popularizing the name of the foul pole in right field at Fenway Park as the “Pesky Pole,” named for Sox shortstop Johnny Pesky.

But to Tribe fans, Mel Parnell – who died last week at the age of 89 – might be best known for the game he didn’t pitch.

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Spring Training Off Day Resulted In Tragedy In 1993

March 20, 2012 | | One Comment

Cleveland fans have their own language for heartbreak.

The Fumble. The Drive. The Shot. Red Right 88.

Little Lake Nellie.

Most of those pithy yet cutting phrases refer to losses on the field, missed opportunities and moments that leave us to wonder what might have been.

But Little Lake Nellie – a natural lake in Clermont, a small city in inland Florida – means something else entirely to every Indians fan, to every baseball fan, hell, to everyone of a certain age in Northeast Ohio who remembers what happened 19 years ago this week.

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Steinbrenner’s Near Purchase Of The Tribe

March 13, 2012 |

By Vince Guerrieri

He was the son of a collegiate track star who went on to become a Cleveland shipping magnate.

He was an assistant football coach for Woody Hayes at Ohio State, and former Brown Lou Saban at Northwestern.

And George Steinbrenner was almost the owner of the Cleveland Indians.

In 1966, Vernon Stouffer bought the Indians. Stouffer and his brother Gordon made their fortune in restaurants and then frozen foods. Five years later, after Stouffer’s merged with Litton, making him a fortune, and then Litton’s stock prices dropped, depleting his deep pockets, he was ready to sell the team.

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Albert Belle Returns To Indians If Only For A Day

February 29, 2012 |

By Vince Guerrieri

For a time, he was Cleveland’s most famous recovering alcoholic.

He was a baseball player who could hit anything, be it a ball or a middle infielder with the occasional forearm shiver.

He was Joey. Now he’s Albert. And Tuesday, he was back in spring training with the Indians.

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Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #1 Bobby Avila

February 19, 2012 |

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we chronicle the career of Bobby Avila.

By Mike Brandyberry

The Tribe’s second baseman during the 1950s helped the Indians compete with the Yankees each season, but his contribution to baseball may have been even greater.

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Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #2 Brett Butler

February 18, 2012 |

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we chronicle the career of Brett Butler.

By Craig Gifford

Before the Indians had Kenny Lofton swiping bases at a record pace through the 1990s, Brett Butler was enjoying similar thievery on the base paths in the 1980s.

Butler set the table for some teams that has a lot of talent but could never seem to put it together in the win column. With Butler leading off and power hitters like Cory Snyder, Joe Carter and Brook Jacoby following, Sports Illustrated actually picked the Tribe to win the World Series in 1987.

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Two Games May Have Changed Dolan’s View In Fans’ Eyes

February 18, 2012 |

By Mike Brandyberry

Two games. It seems miniscule in a season, much less in an era, but Friday, Bob Dibiasio discussed how two games really have changed the Cleveland Indians’ perception and potential revenue.

The Senior Vice President of Public Affairs discussed the two games, baseball economics and the perception of the Indians in a new monthly feature, Fridays at the Field Speaker Series. Invited guests join members of the Indians executive front office to talk shop in an intimate, casual setting. This is intended to be a once a month informal event with varied topical information being discussed. The initial event was indeed intimate, and very candid.

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Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #3 Earl Averill

February 17, 2012 |

 

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we chronicle the career of Earl Averill.

By Vince Guerrieri

Earl Averill hasn’t played a game for the Indians in more than 70 years. But even after he was traded from the Tribe to the Tigers during the 1939 season, Averill’s name is still on the Indians record books as the career leader in total bases (3,200), RBI (1,084), runs (1,154), triples (121) and extra-base hits (724). And his 226 home runs with the Indians stood as a club record until Albert Belle broke it in 1996 (Jim Thome currently holds the mark).

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Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #4 Jim Hegan

February 16, 2012 | | One Comment

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we chronicle the career of Jim Hegan.

The modern era would be far more cruel to a player like Jim Hegan.

The Tribe catcher for 14 seasons—11 of which were as the Tribe’s starter—may never have been more than a back up player or someone with a limited ceiling in today’s game because he lacked the offense to produce. Hegan’s intangibles proved more valuable than his bat, however.

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Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #5 Lou Boudreau

February 15, 2012 | | One Comment

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we chronicle the career of Lou Boudreau.

By Vince Guerrieri

At the age of 24, Lou Boudreau became player-manager for the Indians.

Six years later, he was named the American League MVP when the led the Tribe, on the bench, at bat and in the field, to the team’s most recent World Series championship.

And in 1970, at the age of 50, his uniform number 5 was retired – the same year he was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

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Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #6 Rocky Colavito

February 14, 2012 |

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we chronicle the career of Rocky Colavito.

By Matthew Van Wormer

The next name on our list is most prominent due to the “curse” that supposedly haunted the Indians for years when they traded away the ever popular, Rocky Colavito. Colavito made his debut with the Indians on September 10, 1955, joining the club with the rest of the September call-ups. He played in just five games down the stretch, getting four hits in his nine at bats. The Indians were excited about what this youngster could do.

The next season, Cleveland got a taste of the power that would come off the bat of Colavito as he clubbed 21 home runs and hit .276 while the Indians finished nine games back of the Yankees in the American League standings.

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