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Did The Tribe Win Last Night? | June 24, 2019

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Posts By Vince Guerrieri

Damon Could Provide Spark To Tribe But Isn’t Savior

April 12, 2012 | | One Comment

By Vince Guerrieri

Johnny Damon’s 38. Last year he hit .261 for the Tampa Bay Rays, with 16 home runs and 73 RBIs.

But he’s still an improvement offensively for the Indians – there’s almost no place to go but up.

Ken Rosenthal of Fox Sports isn’t alone in reporting that Damon is near a deal with the Indians, adding another left-handed bat to a lineup that’s full of them, but his veteran presence and experience as a winner – not to mention any offense he might be able to produce – could be just what the Indians need.

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Presidential First Pitch Originated With Ohio, Cleveland Ties

April 10, 2012 |

The throwing out of the ceremonial first pitch is a tradition that started in 1910 with President William Howard Taft. And it’s all because of a Youngstown native and former Cleveland baseball player and manager named Jimmy McAleer.

McAleer knocked around the minor leagues in the 1880s before breaking into the National League with the Cleveland Spiders in 1889. He was regarded as speedy on the basepaths and in center field. His batting was a little less solid. The Robisons, owners of the Spiders, also bought the St. Louis Browns of the National League (later the Cardinals) and essentially cherry-picked all the talent from Cleveland to St. Louis. McAleer opted to stay in Northern Ohio. The Spiders folded after the 1899 season, but McAleer latched on as player/manager for the Lake Shores, a team in the American League in 1900.

In 1901, the Lake Shores became the Blues, taking the name of an older team. The Blues, of course, would go on to be the Indians. McAleer was their manager, and participated in what is now regarded as the first American League game as part of the major leagues, an 8-2 loss to the Chicago White Sox. Read More

League Park’s Long History Looks To Add New Chapters

April 3, 2012 | | 2 Comments

By Vince Guerrieri

Cy Young opened it – twice. Babe Ruth hit his 500th home run there, and it was the site of the only unassisted triple play in World Series history. It was home to an NFL team and a practice field for another.

League Park opened as a wooden grandstand at the end of a cable car line in 1891, and 19 years later, was rebuilt as a concrete and steel ballpark. It served as the home of the Indians full-time until 1932, and then on and off until 1946. It was also the brief but successful home field for the Cleveland Buckeyes of the Negro Leagues.

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Abreu Trade Talks Spark Fans Dislike

March 30, 2012 | | 3 Comments

By Vince Guerrieri

Did Trevor Crowe become an all-star and I missed it?
That’s the only explanation I can think of for the level of vitriol I’ve heard from Tribe fans about the proposed trade of him to the Angels for Bobby Abreu. Tribe fans squawk when the team doesn’t make a deal, and then they don’t like it when they do.

Parnell and 1948 Indians Forever Tied Together

March 29, 2012 |

 

By Vince Guerrieri

To fans in Boston and the Bronx, Mel Parnell was known as a Yankee-killer. He won 15 games against the Bombers, including four shutouts in 1953. To Red Sox fans of a different generation, Parnell was the voice of the Sox, following them during their Impossible Dream season of 1967 and popularizing the name of the foul pole in right field at Fenway Park as the “Pesky Pole,” named for Sox shortstop Johnny Pesky.

But to Tribe fans, Mel Parnell – who died last week at the age of 89 – might be best known for the game he didn’t pitch.

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Spring Training Off Day Resulted In Tragedy In 1993

March 20, 2012 | | One Comment

Cleveland fans have their own language for heartbreak.

The Fumble. The Drive. The Shot. Red Right 88.

Little Lake Nellie.

Most of those pithy yet cutting phrases refer to losses on the field, missed opportunities and moments that leave us to wonder what might have been.

But Little Lake Nellie – a natural lake in Clermont, a small city in inland Florida – means something else entirely to every Indians fan, to every baseball fan, hell, to everyone of a certain age in Northeast Ohio who remembers what happened 19 years ago this week.

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Steinbrenner’s Near Purchase Of The Tribe

March 13, 2012 |

By Vince Guerrieri

He was the son of a collegiate track star who went on to become a Cleveland shipping magnate.

He was an assistant football coach for Woody Hayes at Ohio State, and former Brown Lou Saban at Northwestern.

And George Steinbrenner was almost the owner of the Cleveland Indians.

In 1966, Vernon Stouffer bought the Indians. Stouffer and his brother Gordon made their fortune in restaurants and then frozen foods. Five years later, after Stouffer’s merged with Litton, making him a fortune, and then Litton’s stock prices dropped, depleting his deep pockets, he was ready to sell the team.

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Albert Belle Returns To Indians If Only For A Day

February 29, 2012 |

By Vince Guerrieri

For a time, he was Cleveland’s most famous recovering alcoholic.

He was a baseball player who could hit anything, be it a ball or a middle infielder with the occasional forearm shiver.

He was Joey. Now he’s Albert. And Tuesday, he was back in spring training with the Indians.

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Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #3 Earl Averill

February 17, 2012 |

 

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we chronicle the career of Earl Averill.

By Vince Guerrieri

Earl Averill hasn’t played a game for the Indians in more than 70 years. But even after he was traded from the Tribe to the Tigers during the 1939 season, Averill’s name is still on the Indians record books as the career leader in total bases (3,200), RBI (1,084), runs (1,154), triples (121) and extra-base hits (724). And his 226 home runs with the Indians stood as a club record until Albert Belle broke it in 1996 (Jim Thome currently holds the mark).

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Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #5 Lou Boudreau

February 15, 2012 | | One Comment

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we chronicle the career of Lou Boudreau.

By Vince Guerrieri

At the age of 24, Lou Boudreau became player-manager for the Indians.

Six years later, he was named the American League MVP when the led the Tribe, on the bench, at bat and in the field, to the team’s most recent World Series championship.

And in 1970, at the age of 50, his uniform number 5 was retired – the same year he was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

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Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #14 Larry Doby

February 6, 2012 |

 

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we chronicle the career of Larry Doby.

By Vince Guerrieri

On April 15, 1947, Jackie Robinson took the field for the Brooklyn Dodgers, becoming the first black player in the major leagues.  He was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility, the Dodgers retired his number in 1972, about six months before his death.

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Countdown To Pitchers And Catchers: #18 Mel Harder

February 2, 2012 |

Today continues our countdown to the start of Indians pitchers and catchers reporting to Goodyear, Arizona on February 20. We’ll count down the days, profiling a former Indian who wore the corresponding number. Some players will be memorable, others just our favorites and some, the only one we could find who wore that number. Today, we chronicle the career of Mel Harder.

By Vince Guerrieri

On July 31, 1932, the Indians played their first game at Cleveland Municipal Stadium. The cavernous lake front edifice had opened a year earlier, in the depths of the Great Depression, to host a heavyweight prizefight.

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